Category Archives: Uncategorized

Musicologist Michael Silvers Promoted

Congratulations to Musicology faculty member, Michael Silvers, who was officially promoted to Associate Professor with Indefinite Tenure!

His book, Voices of Drought: The Politics of Music and Environment in Northeastern Brazil, is out this year from the University of Illinois Press and available HERE

 

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Musicology Doctoral Candidate Matthew Knight Awarded the JaFran Jones Prize

Congratulations to Matthew Knight, winner of the 2018 JaFran Jones Award at the Midwest Chapter Meeting of the Society for Ethnomusicology for his paper, “Song as Intangible Cultural Commodity: Neoliberal Governmentality meets Ancient Hospitality in the Georgian Highlands.”

matt knight

JaFran Jones Award

The JaFran Jones prize is awarded annually (whenever funds allow) to the best student paper presented at the Chapter meeting. The prize was established in 1998 to honor the memory of the composer, ethnomusicologist and Balinese gamelan teacher JaFran Jones (d. 1997) who taught at the University of Toledo and at Bowling Green State University.

Read more about the award and the Midwest Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology here: https://midsem.wordpress.com/jafran-jones-award/

Player Piano Reveal with Lecture by Catherine Hennessy-Wolter

player piano

You are cordially invited to the reveal of the Music & Performing Arts Library’s renovated player piano during a lecture-demonstration to be held on the afternoon of 9/22/18. More details about the exact time and place(s) are forthcoming—but the demonstration will be at MPAL and the lecture will be in another location in the Music Building TBD. A modest reception will follow.

Hilary Morris Earns Fulbright to Nepal

Musicology doctoral candidate Hilary Brady Morris has been awarded a Fulbright grant to conduct 10 months of dissertation research in Nepal on the Himalayan lute.

Her ethnographic study focuses on the intersections of music and belonging through investigating Himalayan lutes in the ethnically diverse neighborhood of Boudhanath, Kathmandu.

While abroad, Morris will also provide English-language tutoring and translation in local schools and monasteries.  She also seeks to volunteer with local organizations and facilitate cultural exchange through community outreach. Her long-term goals include an academic career in ethnomusicology and Himalayan studies, directing a music ensemble partnering with Himalayan guest artists and cultivating a student-exchange program.

 

https://music.illinois.edu/news/hilary-morris-fulbright-nepal#.W3rnqyBUyQw.facebook

https://news.illinois.edu/view/6367/664457

Alejandro Madrid (Cornell), Nettl Distinguished Lecture in Ethnomusicology

Please join us for the annual Bruno and Wanda Nettl Distinguished Lecture in Ethnomusicology. 4-6 pm, September 22, in the Music Building Auditorium

Nettl Lecture _ Madrid

Alejandro Madrid (Cornell)

Diversity and Inclusion: Ghostly Gimmicks and the Relevance of Contemporary U.S. Music Academic Institutions

Diversity has been a buzzword in U.S. academia for several decades. However, in many cases, calls for diversity have translated into tokenist instances that often reproduce oppressive social structures within and outside of academia. The current political climate in the United States has forced disciplinary fields in the humanities to become more aware of their social relevance. By taking musical mementoes of Americana that conceal a Mexican heritage as points of departure this lecture explores what diversity would mean in a socially and intellectually relevant music academia.

Recent PhD grad news!

Congratulations to musicology students who completed their PhDs this past year:

Jessica Hajek (Visiting Lecturer, University of Cincinnati Department of Spanish and College-Conservatory of Music)

Paul Hartley (Executive Director, Institute for Human Futures; Sr. Resident Anthropologist, Idea Couture)

Holly Holmes (Operations Manager, Lead Guitar; Assistant to the Director, University of Arizona College of Fine Arts Outreach)

Priscilla Tse (Visiting Lecturer of Musicology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

 

And congratulations to other recent PhD alumni on their new jobs:

Rick Deja (Lecturer [equivalent to assistant professor], Ethnomusicology, University of Cape Town)

Catherine Hennessy Wolter (Visiting Lecturer, Music and Theater Arts Department, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Ioannis Tsekouras ( Adjunct Faculty, Oakton Community College, Department of Humanities and Philosophy, and Department of Anthropology; Adjunct Faculty, Columbia College Chicago, Department of Music)

Emily Wuchner (Thesis Coordinator, UIUC Graduate College)

UIUC Musicology at the Library of Congress

Members of musicology faculty and alumni will give an American Musicological Society Public Lecture, titled “Johnnies, Tommies, and Sammies: Music and the WWI alliance,” at the Library of Congress on May 18th, 2017 at 7 p.m. in the Madison Bldg., Montpelier Room. (See abstract below.)

Participants will include Christina Bashford (Associate Professor of Musicology, UIUC), William Brooks (Professor Emeritus of Music, UIUC; Professor of Music, University of York, UK), and Gayle Sherwood Magee (Associate Professor of Musicology, UIUC).  They will be joined by two graduates of the SoM’s Doctor of Musical Arts program: Laurie Matheson (currently Director of the U of I Press) and Justin Vickers (Assistant Professor of Voice, Illinois State University), and also the pianist Geoffrey Duce, who is Assistant Professor of Piano at Illinois State University.

johnnies

Johnnies, Tommies, and Sammies: Music and the WWI alliance

 Throughout World War I, musical cultures in Britain, Canada, and The United States were deeply entangled in the formation of “The Allies.” As the war evolved, popular music exchanged and performed in all three cultures —filtered increasingly through US publishers—provided remarkable insights into their changing views of each other, themselves, and the conflict. In 1914, Britain was directly involved and directly threatened; Canada, still a British colony, owed allegiance to the Crown but was three thousand miles removed; and the United States was officially neutral but in practice supported the allies and (after the Lusitania incident) was increasingly inclined towards engagement. By 1917 all three countries had become part of “The Allies”; music, as this presentation demonstrates, played a central role in binding the three countries together.

Drawing primarily on the Library of Congress’s recently digitized copyright deposits from the period, and contextualized by a study of the newspapers in Chronicling America, recordings from National Jukebox, and other materials from American Memory, six participants—musicologists Christina Bashford, William Brooks, and Gayle Magee, and performers Justin Vickers, Laurie Matheson, and Geoff Duce—offer an integrated lecture-performance that manifests in its design the process of alliance that occurred a century ago. Bashford, Brooks, and Magee are from Britain, the United States, and Canada, respectively; and they will each speak about and through their respective country’s musics. The presentation is not a series of papers but rather a single, collaboratively authored text, partitioned among the speakers in a series of scripted encounters, and illustrated with slides, films, period recordings, and live performances of sheet music.

Musicology Grad Student Wins Fulbright to Russia

Congratulations to Illinois musicology doctoral candidate Thornton Miller, who has been awarded a Fulbright IIE Fellowship to conduct research in St. Petersburg and Moscow for the 2017-18 academic year.

See Miller’s abstract below.

Thornton Miller

My research is on Anglo-Soviet cultural exchange during the early Cold War. The work focuses on the relationship between the state institutions and the music professionals–such as composers (including Benjamin Britten and Dmitri Shostakovich), impresarios, performers, and publishers–who were involved in these exchanges. My preliminary archival research in the United Kingdom and Russia has indicated that the British and Soviet governments depended on these professionals to carry out Anglo-Soviet exchange, that these professionals were able to circumvent the economic and legal differences between the two countries, and that they were able to shape their own participation in these exchanges to suit their own creative, financial, and political interests. My current research strives to answer the question: why did the British and Soviet governments entrust these music professionals with this much agency?